[Translation] Translation request for Saskia

Alison Wall alison.wall at gmail.com
Mon Jun 15 13:48:13 PDT 2009


Hi Saskia,

Could you please translate the following text.

Alison.

> Taral Wayne
>
> Anticipation Guest of Honor
>
> By Mike Glyer
>
>
>
>
>
> Taral Wayne is a fannish marvel - and there's never been a
> better time to recognize that. His interests stretch back in
> fanhistory to the time of the Toronto Derelicts and all the
> great old Canadian fans of decades past, while his artistic
> vision has helped propel fandom toward a quite unexpected
> future - something in the best tradition of science fiction,
> only it really happened. A remarkable artist, Taral is also
> a sought-after fanwriter. His interests and expertise have a
> wide scope - for one thing, never try to fool him about an
> ancient coin.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>        ***
>
>
>
> Taral first discovered fandom in late 1971 as a result of
> buying a used copy of Fantastic magazine in a neighborhood
> variety store. He answered an ad in the back of the magazine
> that said "Fandom Lives in Canada. Write OSFIC" and attended
> the Ontario Science Fiction Club for the first time in
> November 1971. The club met in a room at a Toronto public
> library, and after the meeting he hung around with Phil
> Paine and Robert Charles Wilson (Bob, in those days) who
> would become longtime friends.
>
>
>
> In Taral's first decade as a fan he registered a number of
> memorable achievements. He designed the logo for Iguanacon
> 2, the 1978 Worldcon, which they incorporated in the plaques
> on the Hugo bases. He also drew a wraparound cover for one
> of the progress reports. Taral contributed a card to Bruce
> Pelz' famous Fantasy Showcase Tarot Deck (published in
> 1980). He was Tuckerized in a novel - made the unseen
> sorcerous presence who ruled the Taral Empire with an iron
> hand in Linda Bushyager's fantasy Master of Hawks (Dell,
> 1979). He also co-edited a fine faanish newzine, DNQ - an
> abbreviation for "do not quote," fanspeak for the things
> people blab and yet expect the reader to keep secret.
>
>
>
> Victoria Vayne and Taral started DNQ on April 28, 1978.
> That was just three months after I began publishing File
> 770, but the two had already decided that other newzines
> (like Locus and, guess who!) "Do not fulfill the need for
> what is essentially the soul of fandom." They would write
> for the people who became fans to "collect coke cans, paint
> ourselves blue, eat fudge icing out of the can, and to bid
> for Worldcons five years past."
>
>
>
> DNQ featured Taral's great illos and comic strips. The zine
> also was justly famous for Victoria's showy mimeography,
> things like perfectly registering a single red word in a
> page of black-and-white text. (To accomplish that, the
> sheets had to be precision-fed through a second time.)
>
>
>
> DNQ lived up to its name by publishing hot gossip about
> fans romancing, and unsparing exposes such as the report
> about a fan who had just been evicted from her apartment.
> (An easy story to get - it happened to co-editor Victoria
> Vayne). A couple dozen issues were published before the zine
> folded in 1980.
>
>
>
> Once DNQ threw down the gauntlet, we began to shadow box in
> a Jack Benny/Fred Allen kind of rivalry that would outlast
> DNQ itself. Taral's feisty humor carried over to his cover
> illustration for a 1982 issue of File 770 where Garfield the
> cat sits in a litterbox reading File 770 and says, "So
> that's what he lines my sandbox with when he's out of kitty
> litter." The perfect imitation of the cat's bug-eyed
> expression and jaded attitude showed this was said in the
> same spirit as one late-night host taking a potshot at
> another, so that the artist, editor and readers were all in
> on the secret: our friendship had been sharpened by the
> rivalry, because of it we ended knowing each other much
> better than ever.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>        ***
>
>
>
> Taral has been nominated for Best Fan Artist Hugo 8 times.
> He received his first nomination in 1987, but is still
> looking for his first win. Fandom has recognized him with
> the annual Rotsler Award for excellence in fan art,
> presented in 2008.
>
>
>
> Like nearly all creative people, when Taral became
> connected with various communities of fan artists his
> capabilities grew more quickly. Fred Patten has written,
> "Rowrbrazzle started in February 1984. Since it was
> specifically an APA [amateur publishing association] for
> writing and drawing funny animals as a genre and discussing
> the new fandom that was forming about them, it is a handy
> landmark to say that 'furry fandom existed at this time."
> Taral had always drawn funny animals and the advent of furry
> fandom gave him even more reason to pursue anthropomorphic
> characters. Throughout the 1980s he was encouraged and
> challenged by this developing subfandom. I had always
> enjoyed his art, and appreciated its growing
> sophistication.
>
>
>
> I remember receiving a kind of mini-retrospective of these
> developments in the early 1990s when the mailman delivered a
> worn manila envelope stiffened with a sheet of cardboard,
> addressed in Taral's handwriting, containing eight or ten
> sheets of incredible black-and-white cover art that he had
> probably done for that closed-circulation amateur publishing
> association for artists and wanted to show to a larger
> audience.
>
>
>
> One of them depicted Saara Mar, an extraterrestrial Kjola,
> Taral's alien alter ego, companion and foil, quietly
> lounging on a beach towel in an airless moonscape, taking in
> the earthshine. Saara Mar looks like a teenaged girl but is
> countless years older and wiser. When she "discovered" the
> Earth in April 1970 her first contact was the artist. Saara
> Mar freely comments on human foibles and contradictions -
> she's from outer space, after all, not someone who has to
> hold her tongue like, say, that fanartist from Toronto.
> Sometimes she makes her point wordlessly, or is content to
> say nothing. That's the enviable thing a about Saara Mar:
> she's relaxed in any environment, social or
> extraterrestrial.
>
>
>
> In another cover, Saara Mar this time was stretched out on
> the planks of a wooden bridge catching the summer rays
> (though don't assume they're from our Sun.) She was paging
> through a scrapbook, immersed in memories of her friends.
> Several of their pictures are suspended in the scene behind
> her. On the left is Petl, another Kjola girl. On the right,
> Tangelwedsibel poses wearing a fashionable straw hat. She's
> a Teh Langgi, a species of extraterrestrials with black and
> white fur and a tail who look like skunks but become deeply
> offended if anyone happens to mention it. Between them is a
> photo of three human fanartists, Taral, Ken Fletcher and
> Marc Schirmeister, astride a rocky prominence.
>
>
>
> The last photo might be considered the furry fans' Mount
> Rushmore. In the mid-Seventies, Ken Fletcher co-founded
> Vootie, an amateur publishing association with a funny
> animal theme, aka "the fanzine of the Funny Animal
> Liberation Front." Reed Waller, the other co-founder, once
> was asked by Taral why there wasn't more sex in funny
> animals, prompting Waller to create the first episode of
> Omaha The Cat Dancer, later a popular comic book character.
> When Vootie ended in 1983, Marc Schirmeister immediately
> founded a new amateur press association for artists,
> Rowrbrazzle and by that time funny animal fandom had
> transitioned to furry fandom
>
>
>
> One cover was a perfectly-drafted line drawing of
> half-a-dozen bouncing bunnies, energetic as a spring
> morning. Why, though, would a fanzine fan want such a cover?
> What has this to do with fandom, or science fiction, or
> anything? There'd be no reason for Taral to draw this except
> that two of the leaping rabbits seemed captured midair in a
> basic position of the Bunny Sutra. Or was it my
> imagination?
>
>
>
> Taral also does art that leaves much less to the
> imagination, but he knew to choose the subtler ones to send
> for general publication. Anyway, it's fun when you have to
> work for it. For example: A perfectly-rendered Smurfette
> poses at the beach, smiling demurely. Why have the Smurfs
> behind her lost their cool? Papa Smurf looks chagrinned,
> another Smurf is nonplussed, while a third Smurf peering
> through his eyeglasses is beaming with delight. The
> explanation is hidden somewhere in the details. I made
> several circuits of the picture before noticing the answer.
> Smurfette's beach bag is open, showing a large bottle of sun
> tan lotion - no problem there. Her sunglasses rest in the
> sand on the other side. The characters behind Smurfette are
> seeing that the ocean breeze has lifted the hem of her skirt
> and the sunglasses are now acting as literal rear-view
> mirrors.
>
>
>
> Another cover was one of Taral's highly-detailed
> compositions, the kind I like the most. Here was a
> reinterpretation of an American in Paris-style café scene
> using all of Taral's favorite motifs: animé, aliens, funny
> animals, and images from traditional sf. A weary-looking
> skunk waitress clearing an empty bottle of Aqua Lazuli (hm)
> from an sf-reader's sidewalk table has been distracted,
> perhaps by the taxi flying overhead, or else by the diners
> at the next table: a solider, a feminine mouse, and a
> child-sized insect gripping a knife and fork. The curving
> avenue behind her leads my eye to the Eiffel Tower-shaped
> zeppelin mast in distant perspective. A different tableau is
> happening at every shop on the street and yet the many
> different ideas are all part of a unified composition.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>        ***
>
>
>
> Furry fandom has also been the source of many of Taral's
> professional sales.
>
>
>
> Taral tried to break into the traditional sf art field
> professionally, and what success he's had is represented by
> a series of illustrations for Rudy Rucker's 2002 novel
> Spaceland, an assignment to re-render the author's own
> sketches, not the breakthrough he wanted.
>
>
>
> Outside sf he's illustrated small magazines, for instance
> in the 1980s he contributed to an American magazine named
> Ruralite. He did restorations of Vaughn Bodé art appearing
> in fanzines for Rare & Well Done Bodé, research and
> illustration for John Robert Colombo's book Years of Light
> (Hounslow Press, 1982). Taral has been a versatile pro: he's
> also made cross-stitching patterns, and produced cards for
> the Tank Vixens Card Game (United Publications, 2004).
>
>
>
> The bulk of Taral's career, though, has been the creation
> of art for private commissions, numbering more than 2,000
> inked, colored, or penciled items to date.
>
>
>
> Perhaps the high point was his work on the Furry comic
> Tales of Beatrix. Created by Steve Gallacci, the stories
> were a collaborative effort - drawn by Taral, co-written by
> Gallacii and Taral. Unfortunately, the title launched during
> a recession in the comics industry and the series about a
> rabbit girl superhero ended after only a few issues.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>        ***
>
>
>
> What comes to mind when people think of a great sf artist?
> Someone whose work headlines gallery openings where people
> sip bubbly wine from champagne flutes and bid impulsively
> for pieces costing twice what they planned to spend. And
> when he levitates onstage to accept the Hugo, his rockstar
> hair swirls in slow motion like a special effect.
>
>
>
> I like that guy, too, but it's a picture of life no fan
> artist ever leads.
>
>
>
> The great fan artist comes home from the market looking
> like Rorschach filled his shopping cart, because something
> in the budget has to give so he can afford art supplies. If
> an extra commission comes in he spends it on an artifact
> that ignites his graphic imagination - a favorite action
> figure, a model spacecraft, a Roman coin - and goes home to
> draw the story it brings to mind. And sends that art to be
> published in a fanzine or displayed on a website. I've been
> privileged to have Taral's art in my fanzines for almost
> three decades.
>
>
>
> The great fan artist lives just like Taral. It's a life
> chosen by a person who loves art and fandom too much to
> spend his time on anything less. And he has so enriched
> science fiction fandom in the past three decades that
> Anticipation has selected him as its Fan Guest of Honour.
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